Become a Dementia Friend

As we recognize Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, learn more about what it’s like for those who live with dementia and how you can make a difference through social awareness.
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Did you know that Alzheimer’s Disease is the only leading cause of death that can’t be prevented? Or that 80 million people will be diagnosed with a form of dementia by the end of the decade?

While these statistics may be alarming, there are many ways we can help better the lives of those who live with serious cognitive conditions. But in order to do so, we must first understand their signs and symptoms and have the courage and compassion to step up when needed.

This week, consider joining the Dementia Friend USA movement and being a dementia ally through acts of kindness.  The free short video series or live interactive sessions on the group’s website teaches simple actions – such as how to recognize and approach someone needing assistance in a grocery aisle or on a bus counting change – that can make a difference to those living with dementias in your community.

Once you’ve become a Dementia Friend, tell us more about it in the comments!

Finished this act of kindness?

23 seniors have been helped with this kind act.

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Share Your Story

Tell us about your act of kindness! Then, vote for your favorite story. Log in to post a comment.
Kim
19 Kind Acts Completed

Pre covid I helped not only my mom but other people in her memory care unit . The most popular thing I did was provide coffee from the lobby because memory care residents cannot access it to help themselves to the free cafe goodies provided to residents on the regular side of the facility and visitors. Instead I would take and deliver orders back to them . I was making so many trips back and forth since I could only carry 2 at a time that the receptionist brought me in 2 trays from a local coffee shop so I could do 4 in each one : ) That simple act made a persons day sometimes and mine as well

Rose lawson
4 Kind Acts Completed

The kind of work I do , is an act of kindness. I wake them up around 6:30 a.m. I let them know how wonderful it is to come to work & see them, doing as well as they are. 💕

Alaya
1 Kind Act Completed

A dear gentleman that is 96 lives to visit with me about politics and current affairs in the world. He’s been experiencing some forgetfulness and it concerns him a great deal. I’m currently working with one of his daughters to get some specific brain nutritional supplements in his daily regimen. Also I am working with his attorney to keep another family member from trying to steal all his money.

Marcia
37 Kind Acts Completed

This is what I do for my mom who was diagnosed with deminta a few years ago. I am her caregiver. We listen to her favorite music together every afternoon and do simple excerise in the morning to help her with mobility and she feels more a part of everything.

Jeannette
1 Kind Act Completed

I spent time with my friend a senior we went to grocery shopping and then out to lunch
I’m thankful that we able get together on the days I’m not working to enjoy each other’s company

Kellie
3 Kind Acts Completed

My aunt had earl onset alzheimer’s. Evertime I visit I’m a new caring so nice person..😁 but it’s all good.

maria
2 Kind Acts Completed

I went to spend time with my next door nehibor Ruth she was happy to sing with me gospel songs

Stephanie
10 Kind Acts Completed

My dad is suffering from after effects of Covid-19 & CHF. So when his legs are swollen, I sometimes rub his legs w/lotion to help reduce the pain, swelling/puffiness of his legs & moisturize his skin. My aunt was a little jealous during a recent visit so I did the same for her legs even though she doesn’t have CHF or swelling going on. Just a little TLC & Pampering!

Dyan
2 Kind Acts Completed

I see people in Nursing Home when I’m on Persia all visit and bring joy and give attention and recognition at all times my smile is like a hug

Stacie
3 Kind Acts Completed

I work as a nurse in long term care. I would go up to my dementia patients and tell them I love them and give them a hug and kiss. I’d bring my momma’s baking to them for a treat and had one that loved grapes so I would bring her some.